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The New CBA


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#1 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 17 December 2011 - 10:26 AM

MLB.com / Jonathan Mayo:

The New CBA What Top 10 Picks are Worth: http://minors.mlblog...icks-are-worth/

The New CBA & Amateur Players: http://minors.mlblog...mateur-players/

#2 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:34 AM

BBTF: http://www.baseballt...e_more_you_know

Rule 4 Draft:

"Every team will now get a slot-based “pool” for how much they can spend in the top 10 rounds, calculated relative to how many picks they have and how high those picks are. the cardinals, with 6 picks in the top 100 will have a relatively generous cap. the cardinals can spend up to the cap on all their picks through the 10th round. it doesn’t matter how it is distributed within that group; they can spend $100,000 on a first round pick and $1m on a 10th round pick. as long as they don’t spend more in total in the top 10 rounds than is in their pool, there will be no penalty. the ideal is that teams will pay slot for everybody. whether teams obey that kind of logic is yet to be seen.

There are huge penalties for paying more than is in your “pool.” a 5% overage is not a huge deal. let’s say the cardinals got $5m to spend in the top 10 rounds. if they go over by $200,000 (4%), they’d be taxed a further 75% of that $200,000, which would be $150,000. However, if they go over by more than 5%, they get the 75% tax AND they lose next year’s first round draft pick. go over by 10% and the penalty is a 100% tax and loss of next year’s first and second round picks. go over by 15% and you lose your first round pick next year and the year to follow. i read the graduated penalties as giving teams room for small errors or oversights, but imposing very stiff penalties for anything beyond minor discrepancies.

Beyond the top ten rounds, you can give anybody a bonus of up to $100,000. anything beyond that counts against your pool fund.

What will be interesting to see is if teams game the system or, if they do, how they do so. as i said, the concept is that teams will pay slot in an orderly way. since there’s a finite pool, any extra money you pay to one prospect must come out of the slot money dedicated to another. but that leaves room to shift salary from one slot to another or even not to sign a player in a given slot, in favor of giving money which should’ve gone to him to another draftee. (ed: this is incorrect. although it does not appear in the summary cited above, Baseball America states that when a player fails to sign, the money for that slot comes out of the pool. this woud seem to make a ground-up negotiating process, starting with the 10th round player and moving up to ninth, etc. almost mandatory.)

Will teams take a chance in later rounds on sign-ability players and just fail to sign some other players? (ed: as noted above, they’d lose the slot money if a player failed to sign; however the team could draft 30th round talent in early rounds and offer them far below slot talent - or as one commenter at bucsdugout suggested, offer pittances to college seniors, to keep money for above-slot signings elsewhere). if next year’s austin wilson falls to round 8 or even round 12, will some team get creative with their pool funds? i suspect most teams will follow the designed plan, since the risk of not doing so seems pretty high. however, some team may find an irresistible prospect falling in the draft and shift money around to sign him.

The signing deadline has moved up substantially (mid-july) to ensure that players sign fairly quickly—which should be easy to accomplish, there being less room to negotiate as most teams will hew closely to slot offerings…."


#3 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:25 PM

Baseball America: 2012 Aggregate Bonus Pools
http://www.baseballa...te-bonus-pools/

As Andrew G said on Twitter, "The #Orioles draft bonus cap comes in lower than what they spent every year since at least 2006? What?!"

#4 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:20 PM

MASN / Melewski: O's rank 11th in draft bonus pool allotment for '12
http://www.masnsport...t-for-2012.html

Camden Depot: O's will be forced to spend less on draft than they did in '08-'11
http://camdendepot.b...nd-less-on.html

#5 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 09:39 AM

MLB.com: Draft to feature new rules,...
http://mlb.mlb.com//...ws_mlb&c_id=mlb

#6 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 04:28 PM

Baseball America: http://ht.ly/b0Fde

"One of the most significant provisions of the new draft rules will be the prescribed bonuses for every pick in the first 10 rounds. Major League Baseball had tried for years to curb draft spending with recommended bonuses, but those proved ineffective with no penalties to back them up. With a punitive tax and the possibility of losing picks in future drafts behind the numbers now, teams are expected to stick to them much more closely.

The numbers build off the bonus set for the No. 1 pick, which is $7.2 million this year. Every pick from 2-338 is expressed as a percentage of the No. 1 pick, down to $125,000 for the final picks of the 10th round. A team's total budget for the first 10 rounds is the sum of the numbers for all of its picks, so teams that have extra picks and early picks have more money to spend. The Twins have the highest budget this year, with the second overall pick as well as extra picks.

Teams can spread the money among their picks in the top 10 rounds in different ways so long as they stay under the total budget. For example, the Astros could sign their No. 1 pick for $5.2 million and spread the extra $2 million among other players. However, if a team fails to sign a player, it cannot apply the budgeted amount for that pick to other players and loses that amount from its overall budget.

Also, bonuses for players signed after the first 10 rounds do not count against the overall budget, unless they exceed $100,000.

Listed below are teams' overall signing budgets for the 2012 draft—in descending order of the amount they have to spend—with the number of selections they have in the first 10 rounds. Following each team's overall budget is a breakdown of the values of the individual picks, and where those picks fall in the overall order."


Orioles (10 picks, $6,826,900)
4th $4,200,000
65th $793,700
99 $481,100
132 $349,900
162 $262,000
192 $196,200
222 $149,300
252 $139,500
282 $130,200
312 $125,000

#7 LanceRinker

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 09:45 PM

The only thing that bothers me about this cap is that more teams will likely draft guys they can sign to a reasonable amount as opposed to best available now.

Plus - if Kevin Hausman really does fall to the Orioles I'm not sure if he'd sign for what they're slotted or not. I guess we'll find out.

#8 RichardZ

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 12:24 PM

The only thing that bothers me about this cap is that more teams will likely draft guys they can sign to a reasonable amount as opposed to best available now.

Plus - if Kevin Hausman really does fall to the Orioles I'm not sure if he'd sign for what they're slotted or not. I guess we'll find out.



What are his choices? Pass up $4,200 and hope he stays healthy for another year at goes 1st in the entire draft to make another 2M or so? That would be incredibly risky and dumb. He'll sign. I prefer Zimmer, Stroman, and Appel ahead of Gausman though.

#9 LanceRinker

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 02:56 PM

What are his choices? Pass up $4,200 and hope he stays healthy for another year at goes 1st in the entire draft to make another 2M or so? That would be incredibly risky and dumb. He'll sign. I prefer Zimmer, Stroman, and Appel ahead of Gausman though.



Yes, it would be incredibly dumb for any draftee to hold out for bigger $$$ because the new system essentially makes that next to impossible, considering how absolutely impractical it is for teams to go higher than the slot.

However, this is the first year with this in place and I'm sure there are agents (Scott Boras) that would tell these kids to hold out or wait another year just to see if teams are willing to stick to the script or not.

That's why I say it worries me - not so much the players as it is the agents and others who are counseling these young men.

#10 SportsGuy

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:40 PM

How many players have turned down 4+ million?

#11 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 05:28 PM

Baltimore Sports and Life: “Per the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team is now provided with a slot-based pool for how much they can spend in the Top 10 rounds. For the Orioles, the 2012 Aggregate Bonus Pool comes in lower than what Baltimore has spent during 2008-11. If you go over your pool, there are increasing penalties. What are your thoughts on this provision of the CBA, and what direct differences will we see in this draft because of it?”

Rawnsley: “I personally like the new CBA, although I’m not sure I’m in the majority in the scouting community on this. If fact, there are still plenty of people, from scouts to agents and certainly the players/parents, who really don’t understand all the ramifications. What’s for sure is that the draft will be very different this year and no one is really sure what will happen. There is almost constant discussion among scouts about strategies but very little agreement on what they will be! You will definitely see the dynamic of how the high school prospect is draft and paid change, there will be definite deflation on their signing bonuses after the first 60-75 picks.”

Garrioch: “I think most teams will spend about 104.99% of what their slots total if they are aggressive and teams that are not may not spend their allotted amount. I think the main difference will be past the 10th round. I don’t that a lot will change at the top of the draft but I think scouts have more responsibility to find out where people will sign and who is likely to go to college.”

Ozga: "The most honest answer I can give here is simple and straight forward: nobody knows to what extent the new slot restrictions will impact the draft. The most logical immediate impact could be the rise of affordable college seniors, junior college prospects willing to sign underslot deals, and high school players with limited college options. In the long run, I have no idea what we’ll see. There are some who think the rule changes could really, really hurt baseball over time as two-sport stars move away from the diamond to play sports (e.g. basketball and football) with more immediate benefits. That’s a nightmare scenario, of course, and one I try not to spend too much time worrying about. A more optimistic outlook sees a future where the new monetary restrictions on the draft actually allows for a situation where the draft does what it was designed to do – reallocate talent to the weaker teams to create a more equitable competitive environment.

And as much as it pains me to say this, all the recent changes has me now on board with the idea that it would probably be best to abolish the draft as a whole. I love following draft season in all four of the major sports, but the inherent unfairness to the players jumps out at me now more than it did when I was younger. The whole system is kind of messed up when you really think about it. But that’s a whole other discussion altogether…”

#12 BSLChrisStoner

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 09:41 PM

Baseball America: http://ht.ly/b0Fde

"One of the most significant provisions of the new draft rules will be the prescribed bonuses for every pick in the first 10 rounds. Major League Baseball had tried for years to curb draft spending with recommended bonuses, but those proved ineffective with no penalties to back them up. With a punitive tax and the possibility of losing picks in future drafts behind the numbers now, teams are expected to stick to them much more closely.

The numbers build off the bonus set for the No. 1 pick, which is $7.2 million this year. Every pick from 2-338 is expressed as a percentage of the No. 1 pick, down to $125,000 for the final picks of the 10th round. A team's total budget for the first 10 rounds is the sum of the numbers for all of its picks, so teams that have extra picks and early picks have more money to spend. The Twins have the highest budget this year, with the second overall pick as well as extra picks.

Teams can spread the money among their picks in the top 10 rounds in different ways so long as they stay under the total budget. For example, the Astros could sign their No. 1 pick for $5.2 million and spread the extra $2 million among other players. However, if a team fails to sign a player, it cannot apply the budgeted amount for that pick to other players and loses that amount from its overall budget.

Also, bonuses for players signed after the first 10 rounds do not count against the overall budget, unless they exceed $100,000.

Listed below are teams' overall signing budgets for the 2012 draft—in descending order of the amount they have to spend—with the number of selections they have in the first 10 rounds. Following each team's overall budget is a breakdown of the values of the individual picks, and where those picks fall in the overall order."


Orioles (10 picks, $6,826,900)
4th $4,200,000
65th $793,700
99 $481,100
132 $349,900
162 $262,000
192 $196,200
222 $149,300
252 $139,500
282 $130,200
312 $125,000


Remember to keep this in-mind with subsequent picks.

#13 Oriole85

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 11:21 AM

Wondering how many will opt for football(or basketball instead). A lot has been made with concussions lately for football. Many have feared for that sport will have a watered down product eventually, I really doubt it. Basketball is much more limited at two rounds.

Bottom-line is this, baseball is the only one of these sports where you can turn pro right away save for Europe or the D-League for basketball, where if I'm not mistaken there isn't as much guaranteed money (and not too many are going that route in the US).
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#14 Nuclear Dish

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 04:54 PM

Biggest impact, IMO, on the new CBA and the slotting structure and budgeting is the preponderance of college seniors being taken on the second day. These are easy guys to sign because they don't have the leverage, so they will be below slot in their cost, allowing more money to be used on the high schoolers who went early.

The high schoolers who didn't get picked early aren't getting picked at all (for the most part) and might not get drafted at all because they are so unlikely to sign now that they can't get the money they would normally want.

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#15 Oriole85

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 01:49 AM

Biggest impact, IMO, on the new CBA and the slotting structure and budgeting is the preponderance of college seniors being taken on the second day. These are easy guys to sign because they don't have the leverage, so they will be below slot in their cost, allowing more money to be used on the high schoolers who went early.

The high schoolers who didn't get picked early aren't getting picked at all (for the most part) and might not get drafted at all because they are so unlikely to sign now that they can't get the money they would normally want.

It will be interesting to see how those later rounds go, because you know you aren't going to sign everyone so do clubs use use those 30s picks to sign high schoolers? In terms of loopholes any rules precluding giving big bonuses to those undrafted players?

If there's a true increase in college talent, wonder if this results in an increase of the sports relevance?
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