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#21 Mackus

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 03:31 PM

My guess would be the biggest difference you'll notice is the sauce will be much better and that flavor will also infuse into the meat.  You can get the short ribs plenty tender all day in a crock pot, but without the larger surface area and a place for the steam to escape the sauce you end up with that way doesn't quite get as thick and sauce-like, stays more soupy.  You'll get a better sear on the short ribs before you even start the braise and will create those tasty little brown bits in the pan that becomes part of the sauce when you deglaze with your liquids.  Plus the sauce has a chance to reduce in the oven while braising if you leave the lid a little ajar.



#22 SportsGuy

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 03:44 PM

Do you use tomato sauce or more of a red wine/beer type thing?  BBQ sauce?

 

I keep seeing that combo with beef stock, which I haven't done yet.

 

There are so many recipes.



#23 Mackus

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 04:07 PM

I usually just use chicken stock and red wine.  Carrot, celery, onion, garlic, and some herbs (usually fresh thyme and dried bay leaf) which I chop coarsely and then strain out after when finishing the sauce.  I'll usually add some tomato paste with the veggies but sometimes not.  I don't really like chunks of cooked tomato served warm, plus I strain out the vegetables anyways, so I just go with the paste for that acidic tomato flavor.

 

I've never really gotten too adventurous with the marinade/sauce beyond the basics.  Would probably be great to take the sauce flavors in either an Asian direction by adding soy sauce, fruit juice, and mirin instead of red wine or Mexican by using beer and some pureed dried chiles.  Should try that some time.

 

If you're using store-bought stock, opt for chicken stock over beef stock for most dishes.  Apparently the beef stock really doesn't use a noticeable concentration of beef, it's basically vegetable stock plus beef flavoring, whereas chicken stock is made with some actual chicken bones at some point.  Not sure why that is.  You'll get plenty of beef flavor into the dish from the short rib bones.  If you made it yourself though, beef stock would be super flavorful.


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#24 SportsGuy

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 06:56 PM

Made them tonight.  Turned out great.  Even my wife, who is pregnant now and is disgusted by meat because of her pregnancy, ate some and really liked them.


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#25 Mackus

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 06:53 AM

Got a bit side-railed in last night's game thread talking about homemade pasta.

 

http://www.seriousea...-egg-pasta.html

 

I follow this recipe exactly.  It's super easy with a stand mixer to roll it out, but you can also get cheap manual rollers, or even just get it as thin as possible with a rolling pin and cut it with a knife.  I've made ravioli a few times and for that you really gotta get it thin, I have found I lack the patience to get the sheet of pasta through the machine into one long thin piece, but my wife is really good at that.  My ravioli aren't nearly as good as my grandmother's who uses a hand-roller.  She's told me how she does it, but I think she's holding out a few secret tips on me, as mine isn't even close.

 

 

Make whiskey sours with the extra egg whites you end up with!



#26 NewMarketSean

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:12 PM

My friends brought out their deep fryers to do some wings for the game yesterday and when they had some leftover peanut oil, we started deep frying twinkies and Oreos dipped in funnel cake batter. Freaking amazing although I paid for it last night. Between all the beer, wings and deep fried junk food I had the worse stomach ache. But it was soooooo delicious.


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#27 McNulty

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:13 PM

Easiest way I've seen to make wings (besides a smoker) are to use olive oil, salt/pepper and garlic/herb seasoning.  Bake in the oven at 375 for 10-15.  Add a coat of bbq sauce if you want.  I couldn't believe it when I tasted them.


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#28 NewMarketSean

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:15 PM

Easiest way I've seen to make wings (besides a smoker) are to use olive oil, salt/pepper and garlic/herb seasoning.  Bake in the oven at 375 for 10-15.  Add a coat of bbq sauce if you want.  I couldn't believe it when I tasted them.

My friend has a Fire Disc. Best wings I've ever tasted are just a pack of frozen supermarket wings fried in veggie oil, then add honey and old bay. Hands down the best I've ever had.


I never had friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, does anyone?

#29 Mackus

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 07:35 AM

Took a crack at some homemade fried chicken for the first time last night.  Was super easy and ridiculously good.  On par with places like Cardinal Tavern near my house that makes damn good fried chicken.  Mine was actually much juicier on the inside, could probably add a bit more spice to the breading.  I only did drumsticks, will try a whole cut up bird next time, and there definitely will be a next time.  Was good enough that I'm a bit afraid I'm gonna start throwing this into the rotation regularly which can't be good news for my cholesterol and BMI.



#30 DuffMan

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 07:45 AM

Took a crack at some homemade fried chicken for the first time last night.  Was super easy and ridiculously good.  On par with places like Cardinal Tavern near my house that makes damn good fried chicken.  Mine was actually much juicier on the inside, could probably add a bit more spice to the breading.  I only did drumsticks, will try a whole cut up bird next time, and there definitely will be a next time.  Was good enough that I'm a bit afraid I'm gonna start throwing this into the rotation regularly which can't be good news for my cholesterol and BMI.

It's been a while since I've fried some chicken.  What'd you use for breading?



#31 Mackus

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 08:12 AM

It's been a while since I've fried some chicken.  What'd you use for breading?

 

Soaked it in buttermilk plus salt, pepper, paprika, cayenne, garlic powder and oregano for several hours.

Then drained and dredged in 1 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 cup corn starch plus the same spice mixture as above. 

 

Fried it in peanut oil in a cast iron skillet. Came up about halfway on the chicken so I had to flip and cook on both sides.  Took about 20 minutes total.  Tried to keep the oil temp around 325 and pulled the chicken when it was about 165.


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#32 JeremyStrain

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 08:53 AM

Took a crack at some homemade fried chicken for the first time last night.  Was super easy and ridiculously good.  On par with places like Cardinal Tavern near my house that makes damn good fried chicken.  Mine was actually much juicier on the inside, could probably add a bit more spice to the breading.  I only did drumsticks, will try a whole cut up bird next time, and there definitely will be a next time.  Was good enough that I'm a bit afraid I'm gonna start throwing this into the rotation regularly which can't be good news for my cholesterol and BMI.

 

My oldest is a huge drumstick fan (and wings since they are just mini ones), I may have to throw this into my own rotation.

 

Do you double dredge for extra crispy? I didn't last time and found myself wishing after the soak I had gone flour, egg, panko. The breading was tasty, but kinda soggy and kept flaking off on me.


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#33 Chris B

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:05 AM

Took a crack at some homemade fried chicken for the first time last night.  Was super easy and ridiculously good.  On par with places like Cardinal Tavern near my house that makes damn good fried chicken.  Mine was actually much juicier on the inside, could probably add a bit more spice to the breading.  I only did drumsticks, will try a whole cut up bird next time, and there definitely will be a next time.  Was good enough that I'm a bit afraid I'm gonna start throwing this into the rotation regularly which can't be good news for my cholesterol and BMI.

 

Was just at Cardinal on Monday night. You're absolutely right about their fried chicken.



#34 SportsGuy

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:18 AM

I have made fried chicken multiple times...it comes out very good but the problem I have had is that it is too salty.

 

I have even cut way way back on what the recipe calls for and still ends up too salty.  I haven't done it in a while and that's a big reason why.



#35 McNulty

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    la cerveza está muy fría

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:19 AM

Yo Mack, look into the Keto diet.  Really enjoying it.


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#36 Mackus

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 09:46 AM

Do you double dredge for extra crispy? I didn't last time and found myself wishing after the soak I had gone flour, egg, panko. The breading was tasty, but kinda soggy and kept flaking off on me.

 

Nope, just the buttermilk soak, drained, and then dredged in the spiced flour mixture.  I thought it had a nice crunch to it. 

 

I think a key for avoiding sogginess when frying anything is oil temperature control.  If you don't have a large quantity of oil and you add a lot of food, it can really drop the temp.  So go in smaller batches if you need.  I managed to fit 8 drumsticks in my 12" cast iron skillet, and by manipulating the burner heat was able to keep the oil temperature pretty consistent.  Had I not cranked the heat after adding the chicken, it probably would've come out soggy and oily.

 

I also drained the cooked chicken after I pulled it from the oil on a wire rack, rather than directly on paper towels.  Not sure if that made a difference or not.



#37 Miller192

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 11:33 AM

Fried chicken is one of those things, like barbecue sauce, where you probably can't beat whats available in a store (RoFo, Sweet Baby Rays).  That's pretty impressive, though Mack.  Their chicken is awesome


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#38 BSLMikeRandall

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 01:58 PM

Fried chicken is one of those things, like barbecue sauce, where you probably can't beat whats available in a store (RoFo, Sweet Baby Rays).  That's pretty impressive, though Mack.  Their chicken is awesome

You absolutely can beat it. RoFo is overrated and overpriced. Working in the city for years I've had my fair share of chicken boxes. NY Fried Chicken is half the price and just as good as RoFo. Neither are anywhere near as good as when I make it at home.

 

BBQ sauce is a bit more subjective. So many more styles.


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#39 NewMarketSean

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 02:03 PM

I am making some lamb chops tonight on my own. Wife/chef is out of town. Never made them before...wondering if I should grill them on charcoal or just sear and cook them on stove/oven. She did make me an awesome port wine reduction before she left that I am going to drizzle over them. Any advice?


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#40 Mackus

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 03:30 PM

Same as you'd cook a high quality steak of similar thickness.  Aim for medium rare doneness.  Charcoal adds some great flavor, I'd go that route, but either option will work great. 

 

Assuming you mean rib or loin chops and not shoulder chops.  If they are shoulder chops, those need a more low-and-slow approach, rather than grilling or searing over direct heat.






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