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African American History


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#21 weird-O

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Posted 31 May 2022 - 01:35 PM

A couple of years ago, I went to the Buffalo Soldier museum in Houston. It's a small place, and should probably be rebranded as the "African Americans in Military History Museum". But it was definitely worth the visit.     


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#22 mweb08

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Posted 31 May 2022 - 03:08 PM

I'm just seeing this thread, so apologies if I'm flooding it. I enjoy going to Civil War battlefields and learning about it. Last month, I went to Vicksburg, MS. to see the battlefield and explore the town's history. I found a tour and decided to reserve a time slot. As it turns out, our tour guide was a direct descendent of Jefferson Davis. That was a unique experience. I've taken to being a bit hesitant to share some of these experiences, because I'm sure it leaves some people with the impression that I'm somehow a southern sympathizer, when I'm really just historically curious. Rebelling against one's country, to the point of secession, is a bold move, and I makes me curious about what would drive someone to that point.


No worries at all for flooding the thread! Thanks for the engagement and I'm glad if you've learned a thing or two from it.

As for the Civil War, I'm not especially interested in battle sites or military strategy for the most part, but like you, the causes (and effects) of war really interests me.

In this case the cause is incredibly clear. The Southerners spelled it out themselves. And the cause was to preserve slavery. Future southerners and sympathizers realized that wasn't great for PR and unlike in many wars where the victors write the history, in the case the traitorous losers dominated the narrative with the Dunning School and the lost cause prevailing.

Now in our currently extremely divided nation, many are upset that "wokeness" and "CRT" have pushed back against such nonsense. The history is readily available and easy to discern for any open minded person still holding onto the biased (generous way to put it) history they learned growing up.

I'm glad you and Ricker have overcome that miseducation.
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#23 weird-O

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Posted 31 May 2022 - 03:58 PM

No worries at all for flooding the thread! Thanks for the engagement and I'm glad if you've learned a thing or two from it.

As for the Civil War, I'm not especially interested in battle sites or military strategy for the most part, but like you, the causes (and effects) of war really interests me.

In this case the cause is incredibly clear. The Southerners spelled it out themselves. And the cause was to preserve slavery. Future southerners and sympathizers realized that wasn't great for PR and unlike in many wars where the victors write the history, in the case the traitorous losers dominated the narrative with the Dunning School and the lost cause prevailing.

Now in our currently extremely divided nation, many are upset that "wokeness" and "CRT" have pushed back against such nonsense. The history is readily available and easy to discern for any open minded person still holding onto the biased (generous way to put it) history they learned growing up.

I'm glad you and Ricker have overcome that miseducation.

Mississippi literally wrote into their declaration of secession that their first and foremost reason, was to preserve slavery. Anyone believing that Daughters of the Confederacy PR nonsense just wants to believe in fairytales. I grew up thinking my home state of Maryland was pretty cool for not joining the Confederacy. Then I learned the truth. Glass shattered. Why did I have to wait until I went to college to learn that? (Rhetorical question)  

It was also stunning to learn that most of the statues of southern generals and such, were caste and placed in the mid-60's as a means of intimidation for the civil rights movement. I always thought it was understandable that Richmond had all those statues of their Civil War heroes. It was their country's capital. But having any of those statues in Maryland made no sense, when I was a teen/young adult.    


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#24 NewMarketSean

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 07:52 AM

I'm sure there are many people in the south who claim to be direct descendants of many Confederate war heroes. Whether they actually are or not.


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#25 weird-O

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 08:12 AM

I'm sure there are many people in the south who claim to be direct descendants of many Confederate war heroes. Whether they actually are or not.

This guy is. As odd as it may seem, there is a Jefferson Davis presidential library. He was contacted by the library and asked if he would consider moving to Vicksburg to run it, because he is his great, great (however many greats) grandson. 


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#26 mweb08

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 09:33 AM

Not trying to start a big debate here although I can see how this could spark it...

The Confederate leadership and soldiers were not heroes whatsoever. They were traitorous and more importantly fighting to preserve one of the most reprehensible systems in world history.

I can see why those very same people (and their wives and daughters) would view them as heroes, but that view should not be respected, let alone celebrated.
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#27 weird-O

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Posted 01 June 2022 - 04:22 PM

Not trying to start a big debate here although I can see how this could spark it...

The Confederate leadership and soldiers were not heroes whatsoever. They were traitorous and more importantly fighting to preserve one of the most reprehensible systems in world history.

I can see why those very same people (and their wives and daughters) would view them as heroes, but that view should not be respected, let alone celebrated.

I totally agree


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#28 mweb08

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Posted 04 July 2022 - 01:20 PM

A patriotic reading recommendation for today:

https://www.thenatio...erick-douglass/


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#29 mweb08

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Posted 18 July 2022 - 01:48 PM

A tremendous thread on Mary McLeod Bethune, arguably one of the most important people in African American history.

 

https://twitter.com/...s_8bekVZ4btY2fg



#30 mweb08

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Posted 20 August 2022 - 05:29 PM

This is a great opportunity to see a conversation featuring Angela Davis at Bus Boys & Poets in Columbia on September 7. Note that she'll be down in the Anacostia location on the 6th.

https://www.busboysa...h-evt-25624706/




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