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Book Lovers / What Are You Reading?


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#221 Nigel Tufnel

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 01:57 PM

The Kindle version of all 7 Harry Potter books is on sale at Amazon for $15. http://www.amazon.co...aec312f53aa0INT

#222 Dupin

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 06:14 PM

The Kindle version of all 7 Harry Potter books is on sale at Amazon for $15.http://www.amazon.co...aec312f53aa0INT


I picked mine up. I'll always value my first editions but you can't beat that convenience.

#223 DuffMan

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 06:55 AM

Halfway through "The Way of Kings",  Kaladin is definitely my favorite character so far.

And done, finished this up yesterday.  Some of it was predictable, but there were also some nice twists and reveals towards the end there so all and all I'm happy with how the book ended.  Kaladin is still my favorite character, but there are some others I'm starting to enjoy more (Not Sadeas though).  I'm sure I'll move onto "Words of Radiance", just not sure if I want to start it right away or take a little break.



#224 DuffMan

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 09:27 AM

And done, finished this up yesterday.  Some of it was predictable, but there were also some nice twists and reveals towards the end there so all and all I'm happy with how the book ended.  Kaladin is still my favorite character, but there are some others I'm starting to enjoy more (Not Sadeas though).  I'm sure I'll move onto "Words of Radiance", just not sure if I want to start it right away or take a little break.

Does a week and a half count as a little break? Started reading Words of Radiance last night.



#225 Mackus

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 10:13 AM

Does a week and a half count as a little break? Started reading Words of Radiance last night.

 

I think I liked the second one better.  Probably because it took me a while to get into the first but I was already hooked by the time I started the second.



#226 DuffMan

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 10:49 AM

I think I liked the second one better.  Probably because it took me a while to get into the first but I was already hooked by the time I started the second.

A friend of mine said he liked the first one better, but everyone else he knew that read it liked the second better.  I liked the first one alot, but with a big saga like this it takes a while to get a feel for the world.  Now that some of that is out of the way more story can be covered, so I could see myself liking #2 more.



#227 Pedro Cerrano

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Posted 26 February 2016 - 01:00 PM

If you haven't read Feinstein's book about life in the minor leagues you should.

 

It's even got a decent amount about Nate McLough's 2012 season -- something most of us are somewhat familiar with.


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#228 Mark Carver

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Posted 05 March 2016 - 09:32 AM

Kindle freebie. Don't know how long so grab it while you can.]

 

The Battle of Hurtgen Forest by Charles Whiting

 

It was the longest battle ever fought by the US Army, Thirty thousand American GIs were killed or wounded. A battle that has been ignored for more than fifty years - and one that should never have been fought. 


From September 1944 to February 1945, eight US infantry and two US armored divisions were thrown into the ‘green hell of Hurtgen’: fifty square miles of thick, rugged, hilly woods on the Belgian-German border, full of German soldiers in a deadly network of concrete bunkers. 

The butcher’s bill was high; casualty rates ran to 50 per cent and more for most rifle companies. The High Command, from the relative comfort and security of their headquarters, miles away from the forest, refused to admit there had been a mistake. Careers, and the pride of the army, were at stake. More troops were poured in and the slaughter continued, to capture an objective that had long since lost any real purpose. 

The Battle of Hurtgen Forest is a classic account of the price fighting men must pay for the prideful blunders of their commanders. 'A classic account of a terrible battle.' - Tom Kasey, best-selling author of 'Trade Off'. 

Charles Whiting (1926-2007) was one of Britain’s most prolific military writers, with over 300 books to his credit. He saw active service in the Second World War, serving in an armoured reconnaissance regiment attached to both the US and British armies. His books therefore possess the insight and authority of someone who, as a combat soldier, actually experienced the horrors of the Second World War. 

Charles Whiting is the author of numerous history books on the Second World War. Under the pen name of Leo Kessler he also wrote a series of bestselling military thrillers, including ‘Guns at Cassino’ and ‘Valley of the Assassins’. 

Endeavour Press is the UK's leading independent publisher of digital books. 

http://www.amazon.co...=hurtgen forest

 

 


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John Keegan, a renowned British military historian, has called World War II the greatest single event in the history of mankind. - Tom Brokaw, NBC special correspondent and author of "The Greatest Generation"


#229 DuffMan

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 08:09 AM

Does a week and a half count as a little break? Started reading Words of Radiance last night.

Finished "Words of Radiance " last night. Things really got crazy there at the end.

Now I wait patiently for book 3. Hopefully it's not as long of a wait as its been for Winds.

#230 mweb08

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 10:29 AM

The Beautiful Struggle by Ta-Nehisa Coates was excellent and eye opening.

#231 PrimeTime

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 12:34 PM

If anyone is interested in the Kennedy assassination, I have a couple of must reads.

 

Jim Marrs "Crossfire: The Plot That Killed Kennedy". This book was used as the basis for Oliver Stone's "JFK" and Marrs was a consultant on the film. It's a fantastic, comprehensive look at what is, IMO, the most tragic moment in American history.

 

The other one is "JFK and The Unspeakable" by James Douglass. This book touches on the assassination throughout but the bigger focus is on the "why" Kennedy was killed. In short, Kennedy was at war with his own administration and the hawks in Washington that were committed to the Cold War and practically wanted to have a nuclear exchange with the Soviets.


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#232 Dupin

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 03:15 PM

Been cruising through The Dresden Files.  Great stuff, really getting into it.  I liked the show well enough before it was cancelled, but the books are way more coherent and way more enjoyable.



#233 DJ MC

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 09:07 AM

John Jakes' North and South trilogy. On book 2 right now.

 

Also just re-read Ready Player One.


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#234 Dupin

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:06 PM

I really enjoyed the first two Cormoran Strike novels (the JK Rowling detective books under her pseudonym), but man that third one was even better, maybe her best work honestly.  It's very different from the others in that the detective work isn't really the focus of the plot.  It strings things together, it plays a part obviously, but in the first one there's a lot more interviewing and working the case.  The third is more a look into the psyche of victims and the psychotic, sort of like the TV series The Fall.

 

Also finally finished the 15th Dresden File, now I'm stuck waiting with everyone else for book 16.



#235 Russ

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:24 PM

I really enjoyed the first two Cormoran Strike novels (the JK Rowling detective books under her pseudonym), but man that third one was even better, maybe her best work honestly.  It's very different from the others in that the detective work isn't really the focus of the plot.  It strings things together, it plays a part obviously, but in the first one there's a lot more interviewing and working the case.  The third is more a look into the psyche of victims and the psychotic, sort of like the TV series The Fall.
 
Also finally finished the 15th Dresden File, now I'm stuck waiting with everyone else for book 16.



I will check these out. Thanks for mentioning it.

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#236 KWebz

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:53 PM

I really enjoyed the first two Cormoran Strike novels (the JK Rowling detective books under her pseudonym), but man that third one was even better, maybe her best work honestly.  It's very different from the others in that the detective work isn't really the focus of the plot.  It strings things together, it plays a part obviously, but in the first one there's a lot more interviewing and working the case.  The third is more a look into the psyche of victims and the psychotic, sort of like the TV series The Fall.   Also finally finished the 15th Dresden File, now I'm stuck waiting with everyone else for book 16.

Did you read Casual Vacancy? I was kind of disappointed. If so, are these better?

#237 Dupin

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:54 PM

Did you read Casual Vacancy? I was kind of disappointed. If so, are these better?

 

I haven't read that one yet.  My understanding was that it was boring, but these are not.



#238 KWebz

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:55 PM

Did you read Casual Vacancy? I was kind of disappointed. If so, are these better?
  I haven't read that one yet.  My understanding was that it was boring, but these are not.
It was indeed a little boring.

#239 Mark Carver

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Posted 06 May 2016 - 03:04 PM

The Twilight Warriors, is only $1.99 at Amazon.com for the kindle version. It was the winner of the 2011 Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature,

 

From Publishers Weekly - Former navy pilot and military historian Gandt (Season of Storms) is a first-rate storyteller, and here he focuses on an aspect of the Battle of Okinawa sometimes overshadowed by the bitter fighting on land: Okinawa was the most expensive naval battle in American history, with almost 10,000 American casualties. Thirty ships were lost, and over 350 more were damaged, many beyond repair. Gandt uses operational history to structure the naval campaign's human dimensions. He describes Japan's development of a kamikaze force so effective that American admirals deployed picket lines of small, expendable warships to absorb the attacks' initial impact. The author portrays senior officers aged beyond their years by the unending stresses of command. He recreates fighter cockpits as carrier pilots tackle the kamikazes and the escorts determined to bring them through. He boards ships desperately fending off attackers no less determined to make their dying count. On the waters off Okinawa it was kill or be killed. As Gandt ably shows, Okinawa taught President Truman a grim lesson: "any weapon," even an atomic bomb, "was preferable to an invasion" of Japan. B&w photos, maps. (Nov.) © 

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John Keegan, a renowned British military historian, has called World War II the greatest single event in the history of mankind. - Tom Brokaw, NBC special correspondent and author of "The Greatest Generation"


#240 DJ MC

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 11:44 AM

Re-reading Lamb, by Christopher Moore, and reading I, Claudius, by Robert Graves.


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